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Category: Literature

Spoken Word Poets

Spoken Word Poets

Spoken word poets have always amazed me with their ability to both write and perform incredible poetry. They transform words on the page into a moving performance experience, capturing the audience with their tone, volume, gestures, and expressions. Spoken word is also becoming increasingly popular on college campuses, with the creation of college organizations, like the Vassar Wordsmith’s, and national projects, like Project V.O.I.C.E., dedicated to showcasing the work of students and professional performers. If any of you attended Sarah Kay and Phil Kaye’s amazing performance…

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Social Media’s Effect on the Perception of Quotes from Literature

Social Media’s Effect on the Perception of Quotes from Literature

If there’s one thing I’ve learned in all of my World Wide Web exploration since my Neopets glory days many years ago, it’s that the Internet is a weird place. It does weird things to communication by making communication so easy and introducing a multitude of forms for it to take. Specific and revolutionary, I know, but I promise I’m going somewhere with that basis in mind. Let me begin here: I love Jane Eyre. A lot. I also happen…

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Walden Video Game Will Allow Players to Experience Thoreau’s Walden Pond

Walden Video Game Will Allow Players to Experience Thoreau’s Walden Pond

Are you a big fan of Thoreau, but too lazy to take a pilgrimage to Walden Pond? Too busy too abandon your studies and go live alone in nature? Soon, you won’t even have to step outside of your room to get a taste of Thoreau: a team at the University of Southern California is developing a Walden video game, which will allow the player to simulate Thoreau’s famous experiment in living at Walden Pond in Concord, MA from 1845-47,…

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Opening Lines of Novels that Work For Me

Opening Lines of Novels that Work For Me

“It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.” It is also a truth universally acknowledged that we’ve all heard the first sentence of Pride and Prejudice approximately a million times. And there’s a reason for that. The opening lines of classic novels have a tendency to become iconic, gaining lives of their own beyond the fame of the novel itself.  There are certain opening lines…

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Literary Spring Break Destinations

Literary Spring Break Destinations

Still looking for a perfect spring break destination? If jetting off to Cancun (I wish) or going home to sleep and cuddle with your pets (my current plan) doesn’t seem exciting enough this year, you should consider going on a literary pilgrimage to a site associated with your favorite author or book. There are incredible locations all around the world where great writers lived, worked, did drugs, or simply hung out—places that, for many, seem like a unique window into…

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In Defense of “Young Adult,” Sort of

In Defense of “Young Adult,” Sort of

I’ll admit it: when it comes to books, I have a tendency to be a bit pretentious. So, when I started reading John Green’s novels and loved them after having turned my nose up at the “young adult” shelf for years, I went through a period of mild identity crisis. I tried to reconcile my conflicting feelings and I was just short of tossing and turning in my sleep over it. Thankfully, I have been courageous enough to work through…

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The Importance of Bookstores

The Importance of Bookstores

Growing up, I was always enchanted by bookstores. At my local bookstore, I would wander through the seemingly endless shelves, searching through the battered copies of used books and the shiny new bestsellers. I would pull out a novel and curl up on the floor between the shelves to read the first few pages, hoping each time that I had discovered the perfect purchase. Now, bookstores continue to remind me of the endless possibilities of the literary world, displaying all of…

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Hemingway’s Paris

Hemingway’s Paris

Anyone who has read A Moveable Feast—Hemingway’s memoirs about his time in Paris, his budding literary career, and his doomed first marriage with his wife Hadley—can appreciate the nostalgic pull of Paris in the 1920’s.  Hemingway brings the reader into a world full of literary giants, quaint cafés, and pensive walks along the Seine. He describes his relationships with other great authors, such as Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein, and often portrays them as unstable and professionally stunted. While the accounts certainly focus…

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